GMO Answers – It’s all how you ask the Question

World GMO production

World GMO production (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The biotech industry recently launched a GMO Answers website as a place for consumers to get their information on genetic modification. The site is funded by the Council for Biotechnology Information with companies that include BASF, Dow Agro Sciences, DuPont, Monsanto, Syngenta, America Farm Bureau Federation, America Soybean Association and the National Cotton Council. Continue reading

I hear the call of ORPP

Got Organic?ORPP is not the call of some exotic water fowl. It’s an acronym for one of the most exciting ideas I have encountered in my entire career. It stands for Organic Research and Promotions Program, which could be a mechanism for creating much needed funding for organic research, education and promotion of our burgeoning industry. Continue reading

What’s the all the Buzz about?

This image was selected as a picture of the we...

This image was selected as a picture of the week on the Malay Wikipedia for the 46th week, 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I have heard a lot of buzz lately from the media, USDA and environmentalists   regarding the state of honeybees.  The decline of the Honeybee population has been well documented since 2006. According to USDA studies, 31% of North America hives have collapsed each winter since 2006. The trend is similar throughout Europe and Asia. Continue reading

The Importance of Certified Organic Cotton

 

English: Cotton harvesting in Texas, USA; unlo...

English: Cotton harvesting in Texas, USA; unloading freshly harvested cotton to a module builder. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Did you know that every conventional cotton product we use has an effect on what we eat and that the by-products of conventional cotton production used in our clothing, personal care, bedding, furniture etc. goes back into our food supply? Here are a few facts you need to know about cotton:  Continue reading

Organic Farm Bill update July 16, 2013

Capitol Hill

Last week, the House of Representatives finally passed a Farm Bill by a vote of 216-208. No Democrats supported the bill, and 12 Republicans voted against it. For the first time since 1949 it did not include the nutrition title or food stamps for hungry Americans.  This new version of the Farm Bill included provisions that repeal the 1938 and 1949 permanent law provisions and make the 2013 Title I a permanent law going forward. If this ultimately became law in conference, it would never need to be reauthorized. Congress could consider them again but would never face a deadline requiring their re-authorization.

The question on everyone’s mind, of course, is what happens next?  Continue reading