What is Organic

You Can’t Beat Organic Gardening To Build Resilliance

Some of us are born with a green thumb, but mine tend toward dirt-gray fringed with edgy nails. The sage garden advice my grandpa taught me as a child eventually came back in Thyme. 

Planting an organic garden is good for your health and peace of mind and just may be a source of security in the wild times ahead. Not only does it allow you to save money on groceries, but it’s also a fun and rewarding experience that can teach you a lot about organic gardening

Even though the Autumn chill is just around the corner, don’t throw in the trowel. 

When it comes to growing vegetables, there are many different types that you can choose from. 

Some of the most popular options include tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, and carrots. But not all veggies are created equal. Some adapted and flourished in cool places, so it’s vital to understand and select vegetables that will do well in your specific climate and soil type.

Planting a fall garden will require those cool weather vegetables like broccoli or cabbage, chard, and kale. However, lettuce, herbs, and radish grow quickly and relish the cool weather. 

Be Grounded in The Soil Food Web 

NRSC Food Soil Web

Once you’ve selected the vegetables you want to grow, it’s time to build nutrients in your soil. 

Healthy soil is teaming with billions of living residents. There are so many crucial critters like archaea, bacteria, fungi, algae, and protozoa to foster. Not to mention larger ones like mites, nematodes, earthworms, and ants. All of these make up the web of life. 

They support plant health as they decompose organic matter, cycle nutrients, enhance soil structure, and control pests.

Nourish them—they are the stewards of organic matter and rich humus that nourishes your plants.

Make sure that the soil is loose, not compacted. You can do this by using a garden fork or tiller to loosen up the top layer of soil. 

Conserve Water – Don’t Take a Leek

smartphone acer jade s in the hands of a man on a background of yellow flowers
Ag Technology helps conserve water
Photo by Kaboompics .com on Pexels.com

Once your vegetables are in the ground, you need to feed and water them. Irrigation is especially important now as our planet is heating up. 

Consider researching and installing a smart sprinkler controller. It’s like a thermostat for your garden that controls your watering schedule automatically. 

It optimizes your irrigation system by automatically adjusting to the weather, making it easier for you to maintain beautifully flourishing produce and conserve our precious water.

Before you know it, you’ll be making a delicious roasted brussels sprouts recipe! 

Cover crops are Fancy Underplants

green leafed plant bokeh photography
Photo by Airin Party on Pexels.com

Think about soil fertility in two ways. Cover crops play a crucial role in ensuring your soil has a strong growing foundation for many years to come. Planting fall or winter cover crops prevent soil compaction and erosion and add nitrogen, potassium, and other vital soil nutrients. 

Organic Fertilizers Are a Solid Number Two 

To fertilize, you can either make your own compost or buy OMRI-certified organic fertilizer and soil amendments. The Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) is a nonprofit organization that determines which input products are allowed for use in organic production and processing. 

One of my favorite OMRI fertilizers comes AgroThrive . Their technology transforms methane-producing animal waste into organic fertilizers. If you want immediate and prolific microbial activity and vigorous root and foliage growth, give their products a try. 

The Emergence of “Hunger Stones” In Europe 

mountainous desert valley with curvy river
Photo by ArtHouse Studio on Pexels.com

My German friend Lutz calls me occasionally from Cologne to check in and see what I’m up to. I told him I was thinking about a fall garden, and he mentioned it wasn’t easy for German agrarians.  

The entire European continent is suffering from the worst drought in thousands of years, and the great rivers Rhine, Danube, and Loire are all baked to a trickle. He’s witnessed the reappearance of “hunger stones” along the banks of Germany’s largest river in recent weeks. 

These old stones bear dates and initials from ancient people as a warning of the hardships in times of drought. 

They serve as a reminder that we depend on our soils and waters to feed ourselves.  

Gardening is a great hobby that can provide fresh, healthy vegetables and give you a sense of satisfaction.

It can also serve to keep you resilient during these changing times. Raking up is hard to do.


Photo by CDC on Unsplash

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