Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference

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Photo by Boston Public Library on Unsplash

I began eating organic food back in the 1980s before Federal Regulations defined the category. Pesticides originated as chemicals used in warfare, and I intuitively felt that ingesting food grown with them just couldn’t be right.

It’s true that sometimes I fudge a bit. If my local store doesn’t have organic onions (which is rare these days), and I need one for a recipe, I’ll buy a conventional one rather than go to another store.

After hearing about a new study, I will rethink my recipe. This research shows that when people eat organic food for one week, their levels of glyphosate drop dramatically! Continue reading “Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference”

Culinary Delights, Environment, well-being, What is Organic

How My Life Became an Organic Lifestyle

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Photo by andrew welch on Unsplash

I was recently on the phone with one of the original leaders of Organic Valley. He pointed out that we are both steeped well—like a couple of fine teas—in organic culture and history.

We have both based our life on organic agriculture and food as a starting place of health and healing. We eat organic food because it’s healthier for us and better for the planet. We yearn to support organic farmers with our dollars and our time.

That belief system permeates outward to everything we do. From our home to our business, to the way we teach others, living an organic lifestyle is not a diet fad—it’s a mindset that becomes a way of life. Continue reading “How My Life Became an Organic Lifestyle”

Culinary Delights, Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, What is Organic

Earth Friendly Living is Easier Than You Think. It Begins Right at Home.

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Photo by Joshua Ness on Unsplash

Storm clouds may seem to be gathering on multiple fronts these days, but there is hope in many areas. I believe at the root of every human being is a nugget of good—a place where we really want to do the right thing.

The world is becoming a more environmentally conscious place. People recognize that to change the trajectory of degradation to our planet, we must take matters into our own hands.

Change happens at the local level, and no place is more local than home. Click your heels, and you’re there? Not quite, but there are things you can begin doing right now, even as you shelter in place, that can make a difference towards environmental change. Continue reading “Earth Friendly Living is Easier Than You Think. It Begins Right at Home.”

Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, What is Organic

The History and Hope of My Iowa Tribe

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Photo by Ryan De Hamer on Unsplash

I have been attempting to reconcile my place in the world. As it applies to my heritage, racial equality or lack thereof, and social justice. Of course, also realizing how food fits into the equation.

This was a personal post for me to write and may not be for the faint-hearted.

Growing up in Iowa, I remember shared slaloms and slides in a wintery universe. Some of my earliest memories are of riding a cold, solemn and wide toboggan down a small incline—Jefferson Hill. A broken wrist.

The land around me was dotted with farms where families lived, raised children and cherished the land. Picture voluptuous mounds routed out by slow rivers meandering from the drift-less places. Wisconsin’s dales—the Mississippi River—The Cedar—The Missouri were around us. These confluences of rivers once defined the tribes of mid-North America.

I was one of the wandering ones who left. When I was young, I often wished to be a gypsy or trapeze artist. I wanted to dance with fire, stay warm and get away from the territory I knew as Iowa.

The place where I was conceived.

Iowa is actually a Sioux word, meaning “the sleepy people.”

The Dakota Sioux they were one of several tribes that could be found throughout Iowa. The others included the Ioway, the Illini, the Otoe, and the Missouria.

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This then is my story of ignorant innocence and privilege—a personal realization of the racial travesty of my own heritage. Continue reading “The History and Hope of My Iowa Tribe”

Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Food is Political. In 2020 Organic Food is Worth Our Investment

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Photo by Louis Velazquez on Unsplash

In this election year, while the pandemic rages, the political landscape also seems to be afire.  Nary a day or hour goes by when some headline screams for our attention, perhaps dividing us.

It’s important to remember that food unites us. Whether you are left or right, food is a universal thing we can all agree on. We must eat to live, and, to live well, we must eat well.

If you believe organic agriculture and organic food is good for you, people and the planet, it may be time to see food as a political act and get involved.

One way to get involved is by supporting a Political Action Campaign (PAC), which can make a bigger impact on the issues you care about, such as food. Continue reading “Food is Political. In 2020 Organic Food is Worth Our Investment”