Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, What is Organic

This Holy Darkness Is a Call for Food Policy Change

Smoke and Haze fill the West Photo by Dave Hoefler on Unsplash

As I write, the entire west is burning up in historic conflagrations.  According to Meteorologist Daniel Swain, “Around 3.5 million acres have burned so far in California in 2020. That’s around 3.5% of the entire land area of the state and is approaching *double* the previous record for the greatest acreage burned during a single year.”

The air is laced with smoke and ash; the orange sun some days does not come forth. The darkness shrouds me, and the air places a heavy weight on my chest.

The earth is sending us a message in this holy darkness—flames sown by our sturdy two-legged species; we have ingenious brains but hold no reverence for the future.

We act like animals in fights for survival as we subjugate her with overconsumption. Burning fossil fuels, destroying ancient forests for cheap hamburgers, farming with chemicals that add to global emissions.

I believe it need not be so and that we can begin to make a difference.

Continue reading “This Holy Darkness Is a Call for Food Policy Change”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, well-being, What is Organic

Five Habits to Adopt to Keep you Healthy and Productive While Working from Home

Photo by Jeff Sheldon on Unsplash

It’s been over 5 months of social distancing. If you’re lucky enough to have a job working from home, you probably consider yourself blessed. But staying focused, healthy and engaged in one room can take a toll on our body, mind and social spirit.

Here are five takeaways I have adopted that keep me fit and sane while earning a living at home.

Continue reading “Five Habits to Adopt to Keep you Healthy and Productive While Working from Home”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Let’s Tip Towards Reason and Heal This Chaos

Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

I can’t help but think it’s getting mighty precarious for our big-brained species from where I sit with ash raining down and smoke choking the air. The earth behaves like a petulant child, and we understand why we are the recipients of her fury.

We can choose to retreat for fear of fire and flood, pestilence and disease. Or we can decide to listen to the portend of her message and take action to put things back in order.

It used to be thrilling as a child! The wind, lightning and rain were a sign that mother nature was alive and vital. 

Now, the entire world is in peril, not just meteorologically but psychologically and philosophically: all have all gone off orbit.

Chaos reigns from the depths of both regions of the exterior and interior. While we prepare for the worst of it, yet to come, I serve forth learnings to keep us somewhat on the firm course of reason.

Continue reading “Let’s Tip Towards Reason and Heal This Chaos”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference

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Photo by Boston Public Library on Unsplash

I began eating organic food back in the 1980s before Federal Regulations defined the category. Pesticides originated as chemicals used in warfare, and I intuitively felt that ingesting food grown with them just couldn’t be right.

It’s true that sometimes I fudge a bit. If my local store doesn’t have organic onions (which is rare these days), and I need one for a recipe, I’ll buy a conventional one rather than go to another store.

After hearing about a new study, I will rethink my recipe. This research shows that when people eat organic food for one week, their levels of glyphosate drop dramatically! Continue reading “Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference”

Culinary Delights, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, well-being, What is Organic

Waste Not Want Not: Granny’s Tips on Reducing Food Waste

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Photo by Christian Bowen on Unsplash

My grandmother used the old adage “waste not want not” for good reason. She was a woman who lived during the Great Depression, she grew our family’s food most of her life. Planting, nurturing, harvesting and preserving food was her life—and she didn’t intend to waste any of it!

In the US, we throw away 30-40 percent of our food supply. That’s 219 pounds per person and $1600 per family each year.

Wholesome food that could feed families in need is sent to landfills. Food is the single largest component taking up space inside US landfills.

If that isn’t enough to motivate you, think about the land, water, labor, energy and other inputs used in producing, processing, transporting, preparing, storing, and disposing of discarded food.

For me, you and I, it may be about saving money. For others, it’s about contributing to the environment and doing your part to save the planet.

Whatever your reason is to reduce your food waste, I’m going to give you some hints from my pantry and Granny. Continue reading “Waste Not Want Not: Granny’s Tips on Reducing Food Waste”