Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference

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Photo by Boston Public Library on Unsplash

I began eating organic food back in the 1980s before Federal Regulations defined the category. Pesticides originated as chemicals used in warfare, and I intuitively felt that ingesting food grown with them just couldn’t be right.

It’s true that sometimes I fudge a bit. If my local store doesn’t have organic onions (which is rare these days), and I need one for a recipe, I’ll buy a conventional one rather than go to another store.

After hearing about a new study, I will rethink my recipe. This research shows that when people eat organic food for one week, their levels of glyphosate drop dramatically! Continue reading “Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference”

Culinary Delights, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, well-being, What is Organic

Waste Not Want Not: Granny’s Tips on Reducing Food Waste

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Photo by Christian Bowen on Unsplash

My grandmother used the old adage “waste not want not” for good reason. She was a woman who lived during the Great Depression, she grew our family’s food most of her life. Planting, nurturing, harvesting and preserving food was her life—and she didn’t intend to waste any of it!

In the US, we throw away 30-40 percent of our food supply. That’s 219 pounds per person and $1600 per family each year.

Wholesome food that could feed families in need is sent to landfills. Food is the single largest component taking up space inside US landfills.

If that isn’t enough to motivate you, think about the land, water, labor, energy and other inputs used in producing, processing, transporting, preparing, storing, and disposing of discarded food.

For me, you and I, it may be about saving money. For others, it’s about contributing to the environment and doing your part to save the planet.

Whatever your reason is to reduce your food waste, I’m going to give you some hints from my pantry and Granny. Continue reading “Waste Not Want Not: Granny’s Tips on Reducing Food Waste”

Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Food is Political. In 2020 Organic Food is Worth Our Investment

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Photo by Louis Velazquez on Unsplash

In this election year, while the pandemic rages, the political landscape also seems to be afire.  Nary a day or hour goes by when some headline screams for our attention, perhaps dividing us.

It’s important to remember that food unites us. Whether you are left or right, food is a universal thing we can all agree on. We must eat to live, and, to live well, we must eat well.

If you believe organic agriculture and organic food is good for you, people and the planet, it may be time to see food as a political act and get involved.

One way to get involved is by supporting a Political Action Campaign (PAC), which can make a bigger impact on the issues you care about, such as food. Continue reading “Food is Political. In 2020 Organic Food is Worth Our Investment”

Environment, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Is Agroforestry a Path to Help Feed Us and Care for our Planet?

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Photo by Bernard Hermant on Unsplash

The modern concept of agroforestry emerged early in the 20th century but planting trees and shrubs amongst fields and furrows is very ancient indeed.

The Romans were the first to write about it. But integrating trees with crops and animals is an ancient practice, likely dating back over 10,000 years ago when our ancestors first became agriculturists.

Agroforestry is based on the concept that the presence of trees in a farming ecosystem makes them more stable and resistant to climatic vagaries than a field without them. Continue reading “Is Agroforestry a Path to Help Feed Us and Care for our Planet?”

Culinary Delights, Social Implications in Agriculture, well-being, What is Organic

3 Reasons Why Everybody Should Practice Mindful Eating

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The term mindfulness was first coined by a Buddhist scholar at the beginning of the 20th Century. He was searching for a word to help us pay attention, slow down and be fully present with the things we are doing. It’s really hard to slow down and notice things in this busy world.

Practicing mindfulness is a little like throwing yeast and flour at a baker—if she doesn’t practice, she’ll never discover the perfection of focaccia.

Being mindful is actually a lot simpler than you think. It means bringing your attention to whatever you are doing at that moment. Instead of stressing about the buns in the oven or worrying about fallen cookies, you focus on whatever you are doing in the now. Now is all we ever have. Continue reading “3 Reasons Why Everybody Should Practice Mindful Eating”