Culinary Delights, Social Implications in Agriculture, Travel, What is Organic

Milk, Fire Rennet and Art – Witnessing the Birth of Ancient Parmigiano-Reggiano

img_3015The Artisans of the Reggio Emilia region have been making Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese for about nine centuries. The cheese we are about to witness is identical to the original wheel produced 900 years ago by the monks of Bibbiano. It has the same appearance, texture and extraordinary flavor it had then.

Unchanged like a living relic of Italian food heritage, we have come to discover. Of course, we come to eat. Continue reading “Milk, Fire Rennet and Art – Witnessing the Birth of Ancient Parmigiano-Reggiano”

Culinary Delights, Social Implications in Agriculture, Travel, What is Organic

In Search of an Honest Ham – How I Found it in Italian Prosciutto

We arrive in Reggio Emilia, a small medieval village between Parma and Bologna; it is smack dab in the middle of Prosciutto Ham and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese country.

We have come here to visit artisan Prosciutto and Parmigiano makers who use traditional methods specific to Reggio. We also come here to eat. Continue reading “In Search of an Honest Ham – How I Found it in Italian Prosciutto”

Environment, GMO, Labeling, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Are New Genetically Modified Techniques the Future of Food and Farming?

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I first met Jim Thomas, Co-Director of the ETC Group, at a Sustainable Ag and Food Systems Funders conference.  Jim had been tracking emerging technologies and their intersection with food and agriculture for some time. When I first heard him speak, in his lilting almost playful cadence, about something called “synthetic biology,” my ears perked up.

He was talking about a new form of genetic engineering that can alter genetics on a worldwide scale – one with little or no government oversight.  Continue reading “Are New Genetically Modified Techniques the Future of Food and Farming?”

Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Jim Riddle Weighs in on The Future of the GRO Organic Check-Off-Like Program

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After the demise of the USDA mandatory research and promotion check-off attempt, the Organic Trade Association (OTA) and Organic Voices (OV) decided to take matters into their own hands. Continue reading “Jim Riddle Weighs in on The Future of the GRO Organic Check-Off-Like Program”

Culinary Delights, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

California State Congresswoman Introduces First Organic-to-School Pilot Program

flat lay photography of three tray of foods
Photo by Ella Olsson on Pexels.com

California has always been at the forefront of change in the food movement. It’s the state that first passed organic regulations in 1990 and birthed the first certifier, California Certified Organic Farmers (CCOF).

The first Farm-to-School projects also sprang forth in the Golden State in 1997, at Santa Monica-Malibu United School District and The Edible Schoolyard  in Berkeley.

At long last, both Farm-to-School and Organic-to-School may come together. On February 21st, Assembly Member Cecilia Aguiar-Curry introduced AB 958 which would create the first-ever Organic-to-School pilot program in California. Continue reading “California State Congresswoman Introduces First Organic-to-School Pilot Program”