Environment, Social Implications in Agriculture, well-being, What is Organic

Regeneration Living: Disrupting Our Paradigms in 2021

Robert Lukeman on Unsplash

The word “Regenerative” gets heaved and hoed around like the words sustainable, mindfulness, and groovy. Most of you don’t remember the latter.

At the behest of a trusted colleague, I signed up for a Regenerative Business Summit. It required six hours of my time. I winced at the nomenclature; aren’t there enough regenerative things already?

It was led by an elder who believed in something other than cause and effect. Carol Sanford really rocked my world of understanding.

She believes that most people operate under a worldview that is causing a major shortfall for humans, our economies, societies, and our living Earth.

Carol loves to disrupt things – especially the way we think.

She speculates that the way we are working may be accelerating the wrong path. Even though we think it’s a noble one. We may be ignoring new possibilities – stuck in our own feedback loop. 

What happened 20 years ago may not be the right solution for today.

What is a Regenerative Life?

Continue reading “Regeneration Living: Disrupting Our Paradigms in 2021”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, well-being, What is Organic

Stay Safe, Stay Sane, Stay Strong – We May be in for a Wild Ride

We are in for one wild ride!
Photo by 立志 牟 on Unsplash

I’m as tired of sheltering in place as almost everyone is by now. It’s been months of not touching or seeing beloved friends and family. Zoom receptions don’t cut if – where’s the wine?

If the experts are right, we are ill-prepared for what’s yet to come ahead. This pandemic isn’t over, nor is the social unrest and discord in our political circles. 

If you ask me, all people deserve the right to nutritious organic food, health care, education, clean energy and a planet that isn’t degraded.

While we sort this out and deal with a global pandemic, here are a few tips to keep us safe, sane and strong, while making the planet a better place.

Continue reading “Stay Safe, Stay Sane, Stay Strong – We May be in for a Wild Ride”
well-being, What is Organic

What Does an Ecological Home Look Like?

This is what an Eco-Friendly home looks like in Iceland
Photo by Sharad kandoi on Unsplash

Ecological homes have been growing in popularity in the past few years. And there’s a good reason for it. We see our world in disarray—we are weathering a global pandemic and witnessing drastic changes in our climate. We all want to be part of the solution, and home is a good place to start.

I always wanted to build a new Eco-home but never had the financial fortitude to erect such a structure from scratch. I purchased a small “cabin” in the woods after the great 1989 Earthquake in Santa Cruz, CA. Over the years, I added additional space that included ecological attributes.  

Whether you are building a new home, adding square footage, or you just want to create a more earth-friendly environment, I have a few tips to help you create your Eco-Friendly home base:   

Continue reading “What Does an Ecological Home Look Like?”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, well-being, What is Organic

Five Habits to Adopt to Keep you Healthy and Productive While Working from Home

Photo by Jeff Sheldon on Unsplash

It’s been over 5 months of social distancing. If you’re lucky enough to have a job working from home, you probably consider yourself blessed. But staying focused, healthy and engaged in one room can take a toll on our body, mind and social spirit.

Here are five takeaways I have adopted that keep me fit and sane while earning a living at home.

Continue reading “Five Habits to Adopt to Keep you Healthy and Productive While Working from Home”
Culinary Delights, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, well-being, What is Organic

Waste Not Want Not: Granny’s Tips on Reducing Food Waste

christian-bowen-3JqVQsShG28-unsplash
Photo by Christian Bowen on Unsplash

My grandmother used the old adage “waste not want not” for good reason. She was a woman who lived during the Great Depression, she grew our family’s food most of her life. Planting, nurturing, harvesting and preserving food was her life—and she didn’t intend to waste any of it!

In the US, we throw away 30-40 percent of our food supply. That’s 219 pounds per person and $1600 per family each year.

Wholesome food that could feed families in need is sent to landfills. Food is the single largest component taking up space inside US landfills.

If that isn’t enough to motivate you, think about the land, water, labor, energy and other inputs used in producing, processing, transporting, preparing, storing, and disposing of discarded food.

For me, you and I, it may be about saving money. For others, it’s about contributing to the environment and doing your part to save the planet.

Whatever your reason is to reduce your food waste, I’m going to give you some hints from my pantry and Granny. Continue reading “Waste Not Want Not: Granny’s Tips on Reducing Food Waste”