In Search of The Tangible and Intangible Mediterranean Diet

There is a culinary line that dissects the midriff of the Europecontinent. This line proceeds in gradients of latitudes that mayblur as you move from north to south.

The people of the north raise herds of cows and goats. Their milk is sometimes whipped into butter or aged into cheese. Almost everything edible is bathed in either cream or butter. 

Here the pigs feast on chestnuts and in turn make good sausage. The pickles are fermented, and the kraut soured to nourishsturdy souls through long winter months. 

Below this imaginary line, trees pervade. Hot ancient orchards dot the hillsides dripping with great bundles of green-black olives. They’re pressed into a nutty oil for the base of sauces and ragouts or a simple dip for crusty bread. 

Tomatoes and vegetables of every size and elongation are bathed in this southern sun.

Every scaled and nautical beast is netted and fished from the sea. 

Italy, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Greece, and Cyprus all surround the Mediterranean Sea, these are the people who inspire the southern Mediterranean diet.  Continue reading

In Search of The Tangible and Intangible Mediterranean Diet

There is a culinary line that dissects the midriff of the Europecontinent. This line proceeds in gradients of latitudes that mayblur as you move from north to south.

 

The people of the north raise herds of cows and goats. Their milk is sometimes whipped into butter or aged into cheese. Almost everything edible is bathed in either cream or butter. 

 

Here the pigs feast on chestnuts and in turn make good sausage. The pickles are fermented, and the kraut soured to nourishsturdy souls through long winter months. 

 

Below this imaginary line, trees pervade. Hot ancient orchards dot the hillsides dripping with great bundles of green-black olives. They’re pressed into a nutty oil for the base of sauces and ragouts or a simple dip for crusty bread. 

 

Tomatoes and vegetables of every size and elongation are bathed in this southern sun.

Every scaled and nautical beast is netted and fished from the sea. 

 

Italy, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Greece, and Cyprus all surround the Mediterranean Sea, these are the people who inspire the southern Mediterranean diet. 

  Continue reading

Are New Genetically Modified Techniques the Future of Food and Farming?

biotechnology bright chemical chemistry

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I first met Jim Thomas, Co-Director of the ETC Group, at a Sustainable Ag and Food Systems Funders conference.  Jim had been tracking emerging technologies and their intersection with food and agriculture for some time. When I first heard him speak, in his lilting almost playful cadence, about something called “synthetic biology,” my ears perked up.

He was talking about a new form of genetic engineering that can alter genetics on a worldwide scale – one with little or no government oversight.  Continue reading

Dear Human, Glyphosate by Any Other Name is Now a Reality

green tractor

Photo by freestocks.org on Pexels.com

As a follow up to my interview with Chuck Benbrook, I was astounded to see the verdict come through on the case of Alva and Alberta Pilliod. The jury awarded them an astonishing $2 billion in damages for their exposure to the herbicide glyphosate and their subsequent fight with Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

Chuck testified in the case on April 17th, and he focused on Monsanto’s “stewardship” and lack thereof for its Roundup-brand herbicides.

Chuck comment that “This verdict will surely get Bayer’s attention. Talk about chickens coming home to roost.” His May 13thblog post, Has Bayer’s Day of Roundup Reckoning Arrived?, elaborates more on the verdict.

What does all this have to do with organic products? Herbicides like glyphosate are explicitly forbidden in organic production. Continue reading

Chuck Benbrook Speaks Up on Glyphosate, Organic, and the Future of Agriculture

CMB_MON_Docs_Johnson

Charles Benbrook is an expert thinker, strategist, a true comrade marching in the field of agricultural science. He is an expert on GMO high-input conventional farming and the ramifications of herbicide use.

Despite the fact that he is a highly esteemed visiting professor at the University of Newcastle, and principle of Benbrook Consulting Services, I know him simply as “Chuck.” He’s my friend and go-to-person in a world sometimes gone mad with unsustainable farming practices. Continue reading