Culinary Delights, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, well-being, What is Organic

Waste Not Want Not: Granny’s Tips on Reducing Food Waste

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Photo by Christian Bowen on Unsplash

My grandmother used the old adage “waste not want not” for good reason. She was a woman who lived during the Great Depression, she grew our family’s food most of her life. Planting, nurturing, harvesting and preserving food was her life—and she didn’t intend to waste any of it!

In the US, we throw away 30-40 percent of our food supply. That’s 219 pounds per person and $1600 per family each year.

Wholesome food that could feed families in need is sent to landfills. Food is the single largest component taking up space inside US landfills.

If that isn’t enough to motivate you, think about the land, water, labor, energy and other inputs used in producing, processing, transporting, preparing, storing, and disposing of discarded food.

For me, you and I, it may be about saving money. For others, it’s about contributing to the environment and doing your part to save the planet.

Whatever your reason is to reduce your food waste, I’m going to give you some hints from my pantry and Granny. Continue reading “Waste Not Want Not: Granny’s Tips on Reducing Food Waste”

Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Food is Political. In 2020 Organic Food is Worth Our Investment

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Photo by Louis Velazquez on Unsplash

In this election year, while the pandemic rages, the political landscape also seems to be afire.  Nary a day or hour goes by when some headline screams for our attention, perhaps dividing us.

It’s important to remember that food unites us. Whether you are left or right, food is a universal thing we can all agree on. We must eat to live, and, to live well, we must eat well.

If you believe organic agriculture and organic food is good for you, people and the planet, it may be time to see food as a political act and get involved.

One way to get involved is by supporting a Political Action Campaign (PAC), which can make a bigger impact on the issues you care about, such as food. Continue reading “Food is Political. In 2020 Organic Food is Worth Our Investment”

Culinary Delights, Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, What is Organic

There are no Bones about it! New Research Shows Organic Meat is Better for you and the Environment

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Photo by Victoria Shes on Unsplash

Just when it was okay to begin ending of our social distancing and meet up, social and racial unrest erupted. Curfews and military violence take the headlines. For good reason, we’re all a bit more rattled, not only our bodies but now also our souls.

As we sift our way towards some semblance of normal, it’s important to take care of ourselves by eating right. Does that include eating meat? Continue reading “There are no Bones about it! New Research Shows Organic Meat is Better for you and the Environment”

Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Organic Hemp is The “Work of The Lord” for This Farmer

 

 

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I was fortunate to meet Chad Crivelli, third-generation farmer of Crivelli Farm, who has grown a diversity of crops, including pistachios, cotton and tomatoes, melons and other vegetables.

He comes from a long heritage of central valley farming, “My grandfather was a dairyman, and my father grew cotton. Chad said, “As a family, we have grown almost anything you can think of.”

His latest endeavor is championing organic hemp. Continue reading “Organic Hemp is The “Work of The Lord” for This Farmer”

Environment, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Can Organic Agriculture Save the Insects and Our Gardens? A New Study Suggests It Can

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I begin with a confession. This summer is the second time I have tended a garden since I was a child alongside my grandfather. For most of my adult life, I was too busy trading organic faire, building businesses—doing what I could to heal the planet through food and agriculture.

I am enjoying this garden with its prolific beans, squash, tomatoes and red Peruvian corn. It’s aswarm with bees, pollinators and insects who work to seed the bounty.

With all I’ve read about the mass extinction of insects, it makes me ponder. What would happen to my garden if they all disappeared? Continue reading “Can Organic Agriculture Save the Insects and Our Gardens? A New Study Suggests It Can”