Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, What is Organic

This Holy Darkness Is a Call for Food Policy Change

Smoke and Haze fill the West Photo by Dave Hoefler on Unsplash

As I write, the entire west is burning up in historic conflagrations.  According to Meteorologist Daniel Swain, “Around 3.5 million acres have burned so far in California in 2020. That’s around 3.5% of the entire land area of the state and is approaching *double* the previous record for the greatest acreage burned during a single year.”

The air is laced with smoke and ash; the orange sun some days does not come forth. The darkness shrouds me, and the air places a heavy weight on my chest.

The earth is sending us a message in this holy darkness—flames sown by our sturdy two-legged species; we have ingenious brains but hold no reverence for the future.

We act like animals in fights for survival as we subjugate her with overconsumption. Burning fossil fuels, destroying ancient forests for cheap hamburgers, farming with chemicals that add to global emissions.

I believe it need not be so and that we can begin to make a difference.

Continue reading “This Holy Darkness Is a Call for Food Policy Change”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Let’s Tip Towards Reason and Heal This Chaos

Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

I can’t help but think it’s getting mighty precarious for our big-brained species from where I sit with ash raining down and smoke choking the air. The earth behaves like a petulant child, and we understand why we are the recipients of her fury.

We can choose to retreat for fear of fire and flood, pestilence and disease. Or we can decide to listen to the portend of her message and take action to put things back in order.

It used to be thrilling as a child! The wind, lightning and rain were a sign that mother nature was alive and vital. 

Now, the entire world is in peril, not just meteorologically but psychologically and philosophically: all have all gone off orbit.

Chaos reigns from the depths of both regions of the exterior and interior. While we prepare for the worst of it, yet to come, I serve forth learnings to keep us somewhat on the firm course of reason.

Continue reading “Let’s Tip Towards Reason and Heal This Chaos”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference

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Photo by Boston Public Library on Unsplash

I began eating organic food back in the 1980s before Federal Regulations defined the category. Pesticides originated as chemicals used in warfare, and I intuitively felt that ingesting food grown with them just couldn’t be right.

It’s true that sometimes I fudge a bit. If my local store doesn’t have organic onions (which is rare these days), and I need one for a recipe, I’ll buy a conventional one rather than go to another store.

After hearing about a new study, I will rethink my recipe. This research shows that when people eat organic food for one week, their levels of glyphosate drop dramatically! Continue reading “Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference”

Culinary Delights, Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, What is Organic

Earth Friendly Living is Easier Than You Think. It Begins Right at Home.

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Photo by Joshua Ness on Unsplash

Storm clouds may seem to be gathering on multiple fronts these days, but there is hope in many areas. I believe at the root of every human being is a nugget of good—a place where we really want to do the right thing.

The world is becoming a more environmentally conscious place. People recognize that to change the trajectory of degradation to our planet, we must take matters into our own hands.

Change happens at the local level, and no place is more local than home. Click your heels, and you’re there? Not quite, but there are things you can begin doing right now, even as you shelter in place, that can make a difference towards environmental change. Continue reading “Earth Friendly Living is Easier Than You Think. It Begins Right at Home.”

Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, What is Organic

The History and Hope of My Iowa Tribe

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Photo by Ryan De Hamer on Unsplash

I have been attempting to reconcile my place in the world. As it applies to my heritage, racial equality or lack thereof, and social justice. Of course, also realizing how food fits into the equation.

This was a personal post for me to write and may not be for the faint-hearted.

Growing up in Iowa, I remember shared slaloms and slides in a wintery universe. Some of my earliest memories are of riding a cold, solemn and wide toboggan down a small incline—Jefferson Hill. A broken wrist.

The land around me was dotted with farms where families lived, raised children and cherished the land. Picture voluptuous mounds routed out by slow rivers meandering from the drift-less places. Wisconsin’s dales—the Mississippi River—The Cedar—The Missouri were around us. These confluences of rivers once defined the tribes of mid-North America.

I was one of the wandering ones who left. When I was young, I often wished to be a gypsy or trapeze artist. I wanted to dance with fire, stay warm and get away from the territory I knew as Iowa.

The place where I was conceived.

Iowa is actually a Sioux word, meaning “the sleepy people.”

The Dakota Sioux they were one of several tribes that could be found throughout Iowa. The others included the Ioway, the Illini, the Otoe, and the Missouria.

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This then is my story of ignorant innocence and privilege—a personal realization of the racial travesty of my own heritage. Continue reading “The History and Hope of My Iowa Tribe”