Environment, well-being, What is Organic

Restoring the Balance of the Our Planet Begins at Home

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I have taken on a project interviewing neighbors for an oral history of our wooded stretch of heaven. The elders remember when throaty tree frogs were plentiful, and the summers were so dripped with fog that farmers didn’t have to irrigate. The winter rains came plentifully, and mushrooms carpeted the ground. They never worried about wildfires, sudden oak death, or sweltering summers.

Our wanton exploitation of the planet is showing up in our backyards. So, we must begin at home. Here are few things you can do right now to help heal the planet.

Continue reading “Restoring the Balance of the Our Planet Begins at Home”
Organic Policy and Regulations, well-being, What is Organic

Organic Milk is a Better Choice and a Path to Change

Photo by Angelina Litvin on Unsplash

Before the Agricultural Revolution, some 10,000 years ago, hardly anybody drank milk—unless it was from their own mother. As our ancestors domesticated grains and animals, all began to change. By the 5th century in western Europe, milk from both cows and sheep became quite popular.

But it wasn’t until the 20th century that we embraced milk like a stampede of heifers. My father drank a glass of milk with every meal, my grandmother churned butter, and we enjoyed a brimming bowl of ice cream every night.  

It was a paradigm shift in thinking—drinking milk became a symbol of nutrition and safety, thanks to Louis Pasteur’s revolutionary pasteurization process.  

Today we drink far less milk than we did in the middle of the last century—in fact, the dairy industry is in udder ruins. Small dairies are closing because of changing consumer trends, trade tensions, and, most importantly, a century-long industry consolidation.

Organic milk offers a drop of hope for dairy farmers and consumers alike.

Continue reading “Organic Milk is a Better Choice and a Path to Change”
Culinary Delights, Organic Policy and Regulations, well-being, What is Organic

Top 2021 Food Trends Include Value & Purpose

Photo by Louis Hansel @shotsoflouis on

If you’re like me, the beginning of 2021 is cause for pause and reflection. People are dying, political chaos still agitates, and we’re all searching for better ways of living. Staying healthy and well-nourished, according to our beliefs and bodily predilections, is a good place to start. 

Eating trends and diets based on transparency, nutrition, and environmental impact are all on the rise.

Whether you’re a vegan, vegetarian or carnivorous meat eater – we are asking for something more basic – food with purpose.

Continue reading “Top 2021 Food Trends Include Value & Purpose”
Culinary Delights, Travel, What is Organic

How I Learned to Eat to Live

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My grandfather was a man who cherished every morsel; he ate slowly and with purpose. As a child, I remember he was always the last to finish—and we did not leave the table until he was done.

The midday meal was the most substantial and reverently honored. We sat and let him have the last indulgence. Comprised of garden vegetables, fresh or preserved, small animals, chickens, roots and bitter greens, my grandparents harvested and fermented many things.

Since sheltering in place, I have been examining how I eat and remembering the ways of my grandfather and wonder…

Do I eat to live, or do I live to eat? Continue reading “How I Learned to Eat to Live”

Environment, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Is Agroforestry a Path to Help Feed Us and Care for our Planet?

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Photo by Bernard Hermant on Unsplash

The modern concept of agroforestry emerged early in the 20th century but planting trees and shrubs amongst fields and furrows is very ancient indeed.

The Romans were the first to write about it. But integrating trees with crops and animals is an ancient practice, likely dating back over 10,000 years ago when our ancestors first became agriculturists.

Agroforestry is based on the concept that the presence of trees in a farming ecosystem makes them more stable and resistant to climatic vagaries than a field without them. Continue reading “Is Agroforestry a Path to Help Feed Us and Care for our Planet?”