Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, well-being, What is Organic

Stay Safe, Stay Sane, Stay Strong – We May be in for a Wild Ride

We are in for one wild ride!
Photo by 立志 牟 on Unsplash

I’m as tired of sheltering in place as almost everyone is by now. It’s been months of not touching or seeing beloved friends and family. Zoom receptions don’t cut if – where’s the wine?

If the experts are right, we are ill-prepared for what’s yet to come ahead. This pandemic isn’t over, nor is the social unrest and discord in our political circles. 

If you ask me, all people deserve the right to nutritious organic food, health care, education, clean energy and a planet that isn’t degraded.

While we sort this out and deal with a global pandemic, here are a few tips to keep us safe, sane and strong, while making the planet a better place.

Continue reading “Stay Safe, Stay Sane, Stay Strong – We May be in for a Wild Ride”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, What is Organic

What’s in Your Bed? Don’t Judge a Bed by Its Covers

Whats really under those sheets?
Photo by CHUTTERSNAP on Unsplash

I am a fantastic sleeper. My husband says he could conduct a marching band through our bedroom, and I would not awaken.

I dream vividly and can sleep soundly for 8-10 hours if the sun would just let me.

Most of us spend a prodigious amount of time in our bed. If I sleep for 8 hours a day, that means I will sleep for 229,961 hours in my lifetime or basically one-third of my entire life.

If you add when I’m awake relaxing with my hubby or reading the news, it can add more hours every day on this vital piece of furniture. 

What do you do in bed besides sleep?
Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

If the average American lies around for an additional four hours, research shows they can spend 36 years in bed throughout their lifetime – that’s nearly half of their life! 

This got me to thinking… should I be considering what I am sleeping on?

Continue reading “What’s in Your Bed? Don’t Judge a Bed by Its Covers”
Environment, Organic Policy and Regulations, Social Implications in Agriculture, What is Organic

Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference

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Photo by Boston Public Library on Unsplash

I began eating organic food back in the 1980s before Federal Regulations defined the category. Pesticides originated as chemicals used in warfare, and I intuitively felt that ingesting food grown with them just couldn’t be right.

It’s true that sometimes I fudge a bit. If my local store doesn’t have organic onions (which is rare these days), and I need one for a recipe, I’ll buy a conventional one rather than go to another store.

After hearing about a new study, I will rethink my recipe. This research shows that when people eat organic food for one week, their levels of glyphosate drop dramatically! Continue reading “Six Days and Seven Nights – Eating Organic Makes a Big Difference”

Culinary Delights, Environment, well-being, What is Organic

How My Life Became an Organic Lifestyle

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Photo by andrew welch on Unsplash

I was recently on the phone with one of the original leaders of Organic Valley. He pointed out that we are both steeped well—like a couple of fine teas—in organic culture and history.

We have both based our life on organic agriculture and food as a starting place of health and healing. We eat organic food because it’s healthier for us and better for the planet. We yearn to support organic farmers with our dollars and our time.

That belief system permeates outward to everything we do. From our home to our business, to the way we teach others, living an organic lifestyle is not a diet fad—it’s a mindset that becomes a way of life. Continue reading “How My Life Became an Organic Lifestyle”

Culinary Delights, Travel, What is Organic

How I Learned to Eat to Live

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My grandfather was a man who cherished every morsel; he ate slowly and with purpose. As a child, I remember he was always the last to finish—and we did not leave the table until he was done.

The midday meal was the most substantial and reverently honored. We sat and let him have the last indulgence. Comprised of garden vegetables, fresh or preserved, small animals, chickens, roots and bitter greens, my grandparents harvested and fermented many things.

Since sheltering in place, I have been examining how I eat and remembering the ways of my grandfather and wonder…

Do I eat to live, or do I live to eat? Continue reading “How I Learned to Eat to Live”